1. Allow scaffolding rental costs in budget. Many people forget to allow for scaffold rental. So It's important to remember and consider types of scaffolds and the quantities of scaffolding equipment required to complete work safely and legally. 2. Certified & Licensed. Make certain that anyone constructing, or directly supervising workers constructing any scaffold from which a person or materials could fall more than 4 metres, has a valid certificate of competency appropriate to that type of scaffold. This also applies to any alterations to the scaffold or dismantling of the scaffold. Insist that scaffold contractors have appropriate certificates and licenses. Keep an up-to-date site register of certificate holders. 3. Scaffold Design. Bricklayers, stonemasons and demolition workers require heavy duty scaffold that safely supports up to 675 kg per platform per bay. Carpenters and general trades require medium duty scaffold, safely supporting up to 450 kg per platform per bay and light duty scaffolds limited to 225 kg per platform per bay. When estimating loads on scaffold platforms, a person assumed to weigh 80 kg. Check supplier's information for types of scaffold rental systems in use. 4. Stable Scaffold. Scaffolds may collapse if: Built on soft ground without timber sole plates to properly distribute the load Too close to...

An Acrow prop is a telescopic tubular steel piece of construction equipment. It is used as a temporary support. Acrow props are known by several names including shore prop, acro prop, acro jack and post shores. They are height adjustable by a wide diameter screw thread which is on the outside of the tube. The use of a screw thread means that the props are able to be tightened when already in place, which allows the user to adjust the load that each one bears.  The safe working load (SWL) that each Acrow Prop can bear depends on the size (please see table). The SWL decreases as the prop is extended.  Acrow Prop Uses Acrow props are used mainly for shoring to provide temporary support during building repair or alteration work. A typical use is to support an existing vertical beam whilst supports are removed or restored. Strongboys are used when masonry itself is to be supported; the strongboy is positioned into the bed joints. Then, an Acrow prop is put in place. Existing windows or doorways may also be supported directly or using strongboys. The base and top plates of props have a 150mm x 150mm surface area, so they are great...

Safety Before creating an opening in brickwork is advisable to make a list of materials you will need for the project. Don't forget you will require a small scaffold to work safely from. Two steel trestles by 3 or 4 scaffold boards wide is ideal. If you can install a handrail at the back of the scaffold even better. It is amazing how often people are injured from falling even when working at low heights. I'm sorry but I am going to shamelessly promote our Butlins Maxi Trestle. We designed the trestle purposely for working at low heights after noting many injuries whilst working at low height.  It's height adjustable with adjustable legs for uneven terrain or steps. It closes down to 47 centimetres and opens to 90 centimetres and you can install a handrail. It takes up very little space to store as it folds up and weighs only 10 kilos. Every Tradie and DIY should have a set. Placement Okay, so now that's out of the way lets get back to what your here for. You will need to install either a galvanised steel or concrete lintel into the brickwork to take the weight of the wall above the proposed opening BEFORE...

Unfortunately too many people die each year falling from unsafe scaffolding whilst working at heights. It's the biggest single killer in the Australian building construction industry. When you are working at height, you need to use scaffolding built by a qualified, insured licensed scaffolder. It is not safe or sensible to balance on a ladder to replace windows, fix guttering or replace roof tiles. It is certainly not a good idea to balance scaffold boards (sometimes called scaffold planks) or a ladder on top of another ladder. Do’s Get adequately trained before using scaffolding. Training must be completed by a qualified person and includes identification of electrocution, fall and falling objects hazards and the procedures for dealing with those hazards. Training must also include the proper use of the scaffold, how to handle materials and the load capacities of the scaffold. Before getting on a scaffold check to make sure that a competent person has inspected the scaffold before commencing work and that it is safe to use and in proper working order. Scaffolds over 4 metres can only be erected, dismantled, altered or moved under the direct supervision of a licensed scaffolder. If you are ever unsure regarding the safety of a scaffold check with a...

Scaffolding is useful for any building project that requires you to work in difficult-to-reach places, both on the inside and outside of a building. Need to purchase or rent scaffolding and put it together? You’re in the right place – in this guide, we’ll go over the basics of putting together scaffolding safely.  Scaffolding Assembly Step-By-Step Let’s start with a disclaimer. When you are assembling scaffolding, do not do it on your own. This is especially true for scaffolding that’s more than one or two storeys high. If you are building any kind of scaffolding for a large construction project, you should hire a scaffolder to oversee the process. If you assemble scaffolding improperly, you endanger the lives of yourself, your workers, and anyone else who is near the construction site, should something go wrong. If you need help putting together your scaffolding, we recommend getting in touch with us at Scaffolds Australia – we can help you find a competent scaffolder to help with your project. Now that that’s out of the way, let’s discuss the basic parts of scaffolding assembly. Build a solid foundation – Depending on the material on which you’re building your scaffolding, your needs may vary, but you’ll likely...

Working in construction? Need to support masonry or load-bearing beams, or any other load that requires vertical support? Acrow props are the best choice – so here’s a guide on how you should be positioning your props for maximum safety and efficiency. Where To Position Acrow Props Here are our top tips for positioning Acrow props for your project. On a solid, stable surface with proper load-bearing capacity – One of the most important things to do when placing an Acrow prop is to make sure that the floor on which you’re positioning the prop can bear the load of the wall or support beam that you’re supporting. Make sure to consult with a structural engineer when working indoors to keep you and your workers safe, and to use the proper plates and support structures when working with Acrow props outdoors and on softer ground. Failure to do so can cause the Acrow prop to fail entirely. As close to the wall as possible – There are several reasons that you want to position an Acrow prop as close to the wall as possible, when supporting brickwork or masonry. The primary reason is that you want to avoid the misuse of strongboys...

If you’re working on a project that requires scaffolding, you may be wondering if you need scaffolding safety tags – and you may be wondering why they’re required by OSHA regulations and Work Safe Australia. In this article, we’ll discuss everything that you need to know about scaffolding tags, how they protect your workers, and why these highly visual safety signs are so important. What Are Scaffolding Tags? Understanding The Basics Scaffolding-related issues are one of the most common causes of workplace injury or death, not just in Australia but around the world. Because of this, steps must be taken to ensure that workers do not climb or use any scaffolding that could be hazardous – due to improper installation or setup, or for any other reason. At a quick glance, it can be difficult to tell if a scaffold is safe to use or not – even for a trained worker – so scaffolding tags are a quick way to allow your workers to visually identify dangerous, potentially hazardous, or unsafe scaffolding areas. They are applied after every scaffolding inspection, to make sure that the current state of a scaffold is known to all workers who could potentially be climbing it. They could...

Acrow props are an essential tool for supporting timber beams, or for supporting masonry with timber needles or strongboys. An adequate number of Acrow props, when they’re in good condition and tightened properly, can support the load of just about any project. But if you’re using Acrow props for the first time, or you just want to make sure that they’re completely safe for your next project, you may be wondering how tight your Acrow props should be. Should the outer tube be tightened completely? Is there a risk that over-tightening may damage the bolt or the prop? In this quick guide, we’ll discuss all of these topics, and help you understand exactly how tight an Acrow prop should be when supporting load bearing structures. Get the details now. How Tight Should My Acrow Props Be? As tight as you can get them – by hand. When supporting load bearing structures, the last thing you want is for the prop to loosen. The outer tube could collapse or shift, resulting in an eccentric load, and the loss of proper support. To prop up a large, heavy load safely, you must spread the load across multiple props, and tighten them as much as you can...

Depending on whether you’re working on brick masonry, stone masonry, or any other material, different types of steel scaffolding solutions may be appropriate for your project. Scaffold safety starts by choosing the right type of scaffold for your job. Working on stone masonry? Not sure which type of scaffold you should be choosing? In this guide, we’ll discuss a few of the common types of scaffolding, and which ones are the right choice for working on stone masonry. Let’s begin. Understanding The Best Types Of Scaffolding For Stone Masonry Suspended scaffolding is typically not the right choice for stone masonry projects, unless they are taking place at heights where building a self-supported scaffold would be impractical. Trestle scaffolding is also not typically appropriate, due to the low maximum height of a trestle scaffold. Brick layer’s scaffolding, also known as single scaffolding, is also not appropriate for stone masonry, as it requires the use of large put logs, which are difficult to place in hard stone masonry. Cantilever scaffolding can be used, in some cases. This type of scaffolding uses a series of “needles” to support scaffolding and a working platform, and it’s ideal for use if it is impractical to build a free-standing scaffold...

Acrow props are an extremely valuable tool for projects that require you to support heavy masonry loads, such as supporting a cavity wall. They can also be used when you’re removing structural support beams, and to perform other tasks that require the proper support of heavy loads using a vertical prop. If you’re working on a large-scale construction or renovation project, you may be wondering how many acrow props you need, and how to set them up safely and properly. In this article, we’ll address this question, and ensure that you know how many props you need – and how to set them up safely. How Many Acrow Props Do I Need? This depends on a number of different factors, including: The rating of each prop – The amount of weight that an acrow prop can support decreases with its length. A size 0 prop, for example, is the shortest, and can extend only about 1.1 to 1.8 metres. It can support up to 3,000 kilograms. On the other hand, a size 4 acrow prop can extend up to 4.9 metres – but can only support around 1,300 kilograms. As a rule, you want to use the shortest possible acrow props for your...

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