If you’re doing construction work, and need to choose a scaffolding material and scaffold system for your project, you may be wondering what options you have. There are many types of scaffolding that are commonly used in building construction. Not sure if you need metal scaffolding? Wondering what types of materials are used to create cantilever scaffolding, suspended scaffolds, and other scaffold structures? Find out now, and see what type of scaffolding is right for building scaffold structures and a working platform for your next job. What Materials Are Used For Common Types Of Scaffolding? The material used for each type of scaffold depends on a number of different factors, like what structure to support, the requirements of the job, and more. Let’s take a look at the most common types of scaffolding and materials now. Trestle scaffolding – Aluminium is commonly used for trestle scaffolding. A trestle scaffold consists of a pre-built H-frame or A-frame, which supports one working platform using a transom. This type of scaffolding is very easy to put together and assemble, making it ideal for working on single-story projects. House painters and other handymen usually prefer to use trestle scaffolding. Aluminium is useful for trestle scaffolding because it’s...

Acrow props are one of the best temporary support options if you need to support a large, static overhead load. Whether you’re supporting a ceiling while removing support beams, heavy overhead timbers, or masonry with timber needles or a strongboy, an Acrow prop is a very useful temporary support to have on hand for a number of different projects. But one of the biggest drawbacks of Acrow props is that they have poor resistance to shear forces. Their support capabilities can become compromised if they’re more than 1.5° away from the vertical plane. Bracing Acrow props helps make up for this. Acrow props still should only be used to support vertical loads, but if you brace them, they will be stronger and more reliable, particularly in situations where horizontal loads may be higher than anticipated. Bracing An Acrow Prop With Scaffolding Tube – What You Need To Know Most modern Acrow props are designed to be compatible with standard-gauge scaffolding tubing. Using a coupler, you can easily connect multiple Acrow props together with scaffolding tubing. Typically, the best way to secure an Acrow prop with a scaffolding tube is to attach it to each prop in sequence diagonally. Doing so will allow the forces...

Scaffolding is often required for large-scale construction and repairs. Whether you’re building a new commercial structure, rehabbing an existing building, or undertaking any other large-scale project, you may need a professional scaffolding company to help you set up everything you need to get started. And, to keep your workers safe and conform to Australian workplace safety regulations, it’s important that you know when – and how often – to inspect your scaffold structure. Not sure when your scaffolding should be inspected? Read on to get details about the laws related to scaffolding inspections in Australia – and common-sense best practices that will help keep your workers safe. When Should My Scaffolding Be Inspected? According to Safe Work Australia, there are a number of guidelines related to scaffolding inspection. First, any scaffold – including a spur, hung, suspended or cantilevered scaffold – from which any person or thing could fall for more than 4 metres must be inspected. The scaffold cannot be used unless there is written confirmation from a competent person, certifying that the construction of the scaffolding is complete. Beyond this, a scaffold and all related supporting structures must be inspected by a competent person: Before scaffolds and scaffolding are used, if there...

Acrow props are a great option for vertical support, especially for supporting ceilings in the construction industry when you’re removing support beams, masonry, or any other material. The proper number of Acrow props, when properly installed, can easily support even the heaviest loads, and allow you to conduct repairs and make building improvements without risking your own safety, or the safety of your workers. So, how can you use Acrow props to support a ceiling while removing load bearing beams or supports? Get the details from Australian Scaffolds below. Supporting A Ceiling With An Acrow Prop – Our Top Tips First things first, you should consult with a structural engineer to determine how many Acrow props you’ll need, and the proper size for your Acrow props. Failing to use the proper number of Acrow props can result in critical failure of the ceiling, and property damage, injuries, or even death. You should place your Acrow props on a solid, flat surface that can handle the weight of the ceiling, to ensure that the load is distributed properly. You may also want to use sole boards or steel plates to distribute the load evenly. In addition, your Acrow props should be as vertical as possible –...

There are many different types of scaffolding used in construction and maintenance jobs. From suspended scaffolding and single scaffolding to trestle scaffolding which is supported on movable ladders, cantilever scaffolding which uses a series of needles for support, and brick layer scaffolding, it’s often hard to know which type is right for you. But if you’re wondering what double scaffolding is and how it’s used, you’re in the right place. In this article, we’ll discuss everything that you need to know about this unique type of scaffolding, which is typically used for stone masonry and brick masonry. What Is Double Scaffolding And When Is It Used? To understand when double scaffolding is used, let’s start by defining single scaffolding. Traditional, single scaffolding is often used to work on brick-based walls and projects, which is why it’s sometimes called “bricklayers” scaffolding. Single scaffolding uses one row of “putlogs” which are put directly into the wall, and used to support ledgers and standards, at a distance of about 1.2 metres from the wall. The distance between each standard is usually between 2-2.5 metres, and ledgers are used to join the standards at distances with gaps of between 1.2-1.5 metres. While this is effective for softer brick walls,...

Acrow props are a powerful way to hold up large, static vertical loads. They’re perfect to support a large timber cross beam during construction, for example, or to hold up a masonry wall for repairs. But when it comes to how long you should wait before removing Acrow props, you may have some questions. When is it safe to remove the prop? How should it be done? What precautions should you take? In this quick blog post, the team at Australian Scaffolds will help you understand all of the basics. When Should Acrow Props Be Removed? No matter what kind of work you’re using an Acrow prop for, you should wait until the supported structure can hold its weight on its own – or there is another brace or support in place. If you’re supporting a large timber cross-beam and replace the attached vertical support columns, for example, you can remove the Acrow prop once the new support structures have been securely bolted, nailed, or otherwise secured fastly in place. The Acrow prop should never be removed until the structure is completely sound. The same is true of a load-bearing wall – the acrow props should only be removed once new supports have...

One of the fastest ways to put yourself in hospital is by using a ladder incorrectly. So, before you rush into your next job read our advice. You don't need me to remind you that climbing ladders is potentially dangerous, but that's what I'm going to do: There are 10 crucial statistics that you need to know about working at heights. According to Safe Work Australia: Every year in Australia, an average of 29 people dies from work-related falls. Falling from a height was the cause of 11% of all work-related deaths in Australia. Half of the fatal falls involved distances of three metres or less (31% from a height of two metres or less, and a further 19% involved falls from between two and three metres). 21 employees every day lodge claims for a falls-related injury that required one or more weeks off work in Australia. A typical claim due to a fall from height involved 6 weeks off work and compensation paid average over $14,000 per claim. The industries with the highest numbers of serious falls-related claims are Construction (20%), Manufacturing (12%) and Transport & Storage (11%). Falls from ladders were the primary cause of work-related fatalities from heights (16%). Falls...

Australian Scaffolds & Access Pty recently appointed a new scaffold engineer to work in the scaffold development team. Kiri Logan, a Mechanical Engineer B.Sc (Eng)  primary focus is on designing new and improved scaffold components to add to the Butlin Maxi Equipment product range. If you have any technical questions or need a design change, call and speak to Kiri on 1300 919 905. Welcome aboard Kiri!...

Craneable Scaffolding Australian Scaffolds Talent Tuesday was a great success with Terry McDougall. Terry presented information to Australian Scaffolds sales people regarding the benefits of using craneable scaffolding. Australian Scaffold were appointed to design and install a 12m scaffold stairway tower. Providing access to one of the largest infrastructure projects in the Sydney area. The ever-changing access requirements on site were the inspiration for a design that would allow for the quick and efficient relocation of the tower at short notice. Australian Scaffolds technical team, designed a remarkable craneable Layher Allround stair tower solution. Layher’s intelligent connection technology, combined with the high load-bearing capacity of Layher Allround’s diagonal braces brought this lateral-thinking solution to a practical conclusion: the 12m high stairway tower was assembled horizontally, then simply lifted by crane and placed in the required position on site. Subsequent relocations of the structure also involve crane-handling and were remarkably straightforward. This impressive solution offered the client speed of assembly, saving in labour costs and avoided risks associated with working at height. Daniel Butlin, Director of Australian Scaffold, commented “We were able to completely relocate this 12m high scaffold access stair  tower in under 2 hours, with only 2 men. Crane-handling not only significantly reduced...

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